Bullous Pemphigoid

  • Medical Author:
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Bullous Pemphigoid Symptoms & Signs

Blisters

Blisters can accompany some types of skin rashes and inflammatory conditions, including certain autoimmune diseases. Depending upon the cause of the blisters, blisters may occur singly or in groups. In contrast to abscesses and boils, which are collections of inflammatory fluid found deep in the tissues, blisters are found in the most superficial layer of skin.

Bullous pemphigoid facts

  • Bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune skin disease characterized by blisters.
  • The cause of bullous pemphigoid is not known.
  • Bullous pemphigoid can involve the lining of the mouth and nose.
  • The diagnosis of bullous pemphigoid is ultimately confirmed by biopsy.
  • Treatment of bullous pemphigoid is individualized and depends on the location and severity of the disease.

What is bullous pemphigoid?

Bullous pemphigoid is an uncommon skin disease characterized by tense blisters on the surface of the skin. Occasionally, the inner lining tissue of the mouth, nasal passages, or conjunctivae of the eyes (mucous membrane tissue) can be involved. The condition is caused by antibodies and inflammation abnormally accumulating in a particular layer of the skin or mucous membranes. This layer of tissue is called the "basement membrane." These antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind to proteins in the basement membrane called hemidesmosomal BP antigens and this attracts cells of inflammation. The mucous membrane disease is also referred to separately as mucous membrane pemphigoid.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/31/2016

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