Breast Cancer

  • Medical Author:
    Jerry R. Balentine, DO, FACEP

    Dr. Balentine received his undergraduate degree from McDaniel College in Westminster, Maryland. He attended medical school at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine graduating in1983. He completed his internship at St. Joseph's Hospital in Philadelphia and his Emergency Medicine residency at Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center in the Bronx, where he served as chief resident.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Pink Ribbon for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Quick GuideBreast Cancer Pictures Slideshow: A Visual Guide to Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer Pictures Slideshow: A Visual Guide to Breast Cancer

Is my family history relevant to my breast cancer diagnosis?

If you have a strong (positive) family history for breast cancer, ovarian cancer, or even prostate cancer, this information is relevant to your diagnosis. A strong family history in this case usually means that a mother, sibling, child, or father has had a related malignancy. Information about other family members (aunts, nieces, etc.) is also important. This is especially significant if the diagnosis of breast cancer was made at an early age or involved both breasts or a breast and an ovary in the same individual. A positive family history may necessitate a more comprehensive diagnostic workup, more involved treatment, and consideration of genetic testing, not only for you but for other family members.

What other studies should be done on my breast tissue biopsy?

Microscopic evaluation of the slides made from involved tissue provides critical information about the tumor. A reasonably accurate prediction of tumor behavior can be made based on the appearance of the cancer cells, their size and similarity to one another, and the presence or absence of these cells in the lymphatic and blood vessels immediately adjacent to the tumor. This type of evaluation is a standard part of the diagnostic process.

However, there are additional relevant data that the laboratory should obtain, and this analysis is directed by the pathologist at the time of diagnosis. This information includes, at a minimum, an assessment of the estrogen and progesterone receptors on the malignant cells and the status of at least one oncogene, called her-2-neu. An oncogene is a gene that plays a normal role in cell growth but, when altered, may contribute to abnormal cell division and tumor growth.

Currently, these tests (estrogen and progesterone receptors and her-2-neu) have an accurate enough predictive value that their status should be determined in all cases of breast cancer. Test results are available within a few days to a week after removal of the tumor tissue. The results of these tests should then be taken into account in the final decision-making about treatment. These tests are constantly evolving and changing, and your treatment team will be able to discuss the current standard and advanced testing available.

Genomic assays (tests that evaluate gene expression) in the tumor tissue are often performed on certain breast cancers to help determine the likelihood that a tumor will recur (come back) and to help determine whether chemotherapy will be beneficial.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/25/2016
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