Brain Hemorrhage (Brain Bleeding)

  • Medical Author:
    Danette C. Taylor, DO, MS, FACN

    Dr. Taylor has a passion for treating patients as individuals. In practice since 1994, she has a wide range of experience in treating patients with many types of movement disorders and dementias. In addition to patient care, she is actively involved in the training of residents and medical students, and has been both primary and secondary investigator in numerous research studies through the years. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Michigan State University's College of Osteopathic Medicine (Department of Neurology and Ophthalmology). She graduated with a BS degree from Alma College, and an MS (biomechanics) from Michigan State University. She received her medical degree from Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine. Her internship and residency were completed at Botsford General Hospital. Additionally, she completed a fellowship in movement disorders with Dr. Peter LeWitt. She has been named a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychiatrists. She is board-certified in neurology by the American Osteopathic Board of Neurology and Psychiatry. She has authored several articles and lectured extensively; she continues to write questions for two national medical boards. Dr. Taylor is a member of the Medical and Scientific Advisory Council (MSAC) of the Alzheimer's Association of Michigan, and is a reviewer for the journal Clinical Neuropharmacology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

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What is the prognosis after a brain hemorrhage? Is recovery possible?

Many patients who have experienced a brain hemorrhage do survive. However, survival rates are decreased when the bleeding occurs in certain areas of the brain or if the initial bleed was very large.

If a patient survives the initial event of an intracranial hemorrhage, recovery may take many months. Over time and with extensive rehabilitation efforts, including physical, occupational, and speech therapy, patients can regain function. However, some can be left with persistent weakness or sensory problems. Other patients may have residual seizures, headaches, or memory problems.

Special situations

Infants less than 32 weeks gestational age are at higher risk of developing intracranial bleeding, due to the immaturity of the blood vessels. A significant percentage of premature infants may develop some amount of intracranial hemorrhage. This can lead to hydrocephalus, or an enlargement of the fluid-filled spaces of the brain, and can be very serious. If delivery cannot be delayed, certain medications can be given to the mother in an effort to help prevent this condition.

Medically reviewed by Joseph Carcione, DO; American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

REFERENCES:

Adeoye, O. and J. P. Broderick. "Advances in the management of intracerebral hemorrhage." Nature Reviews. Neurology. 6.11 (2010): 593-601.

Truelsen, T., et al. "The global burden of cerebrovascular disease." World Health Organization, Global Burden of Disease 2000.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 10/29/2015
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