bitolterol mesylate, Tornalate

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

Asthma Attack Treatment

GENERIC NAME: bitolterol mesylate

BRAND NAME: (Tornalate: This brand no longer is available in the U.S. and there are no generic versions.)

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Bitolterol is a bronchodilator used in the treatment of asthma. It is similar to albuterol (Ventolin). Asthma is a disorder of breathing in which there is narrowing of the airways that carry air to the lungs including the bronchi. This narrowing is caused by muscle spasm and inflammation within the airways. Bitolterol relaxes the smooth muscles surrounding these airways, increasing the diameter and thus easing the flow of air through the airways. Bitolterol probably does not affect inflammation in the lung either with asthma or other inflammatory lung disorders such as bronchitis. Nevertheless, if spasm of the airways occurs because of bronchitis, bitolterol may be useful therapy for the asthmatic component of the illness. Bitolterol is unique in that it is a "prodrug;" It must first be converted by the body into its active form. Bitolterol has a rapid onset of action (2-5 minutes), and its effects may last up to 6-8 hours. The FDA approved bitolterol in December 1984.

PRESCRIPTION: Yes

GENERIC AVAILABLE: No

PREPARATIONS: Inhaler: 0.37 mg/Inhalation; Solution for Inhalation: 0.2%

STORAGE: Bitolterol should be stored at room temperature, 15 C to 30 C (59 F to 86 F).

PRESCRIBED FOR: Bitolterol is used for the relief of bronchospasm due to asthma and other respiratory illnesses.

DOSING: The recommended adult dose for treating asthma is 2 inhalations every 8 hours. Maximum dose is 2 inhalations every 4 hours or 3 inhalations every 6 hours. This drug was not approved for use in children under 12 years old.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/27/2014

Quick GuideAsthma Pictures Slideshow: An Inflammatory Disorder of the Airways

Asthma Pictures Slideshow: An Inflammatory Disorder of the Airways
FDA Logo

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

RxList Logo

Need help identifying pills and medications?

Use the pill identifier tool on RxList.

Subscribe to MedicineNet's Allergy and Asthma Newsletter

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors