benazepril and hydrochlorothiazide, Lotensin HCT (cont.)

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When taken with lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid), benazepril can increase lithium to toxic levels in the blood.

Nitritoid reactions (symptoms include facial flushing, nausea, vomiting, and hypotension) may occur when injectable gold (sodium aurothiomalate), used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, is combined with ACE inhibitors, including benazepril. Hydrochlorothiazide reduces the elimination of lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith) by the kidneys and can lead to lithium toxicity. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, for example, ibuprofen, may reduce the blood pressure lowering effects of hydrochlorothiazide. Blood sugar levels can be elevated by HCTZ necessitating adjustments in the doses of medications that are used for treating diabetes.

Combining HCTZ with corticosteroids may increase the risk for low levels of blood potassium and other electrolytes. Low blood potassium can increase the toxicity of digoxin (Lanoxin). Cholestyramine (Questran, Questran Light) and colestipol (Colestid) bind to hydrochlorothiazide and reduce its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract by 43% to 85%.

PREGNANCY: When used in the second or third trimester of pregnancy ACE inhibitors can cause injury and even death to the fetus. Lotensin HCT should not be used during pregnancy.

NURSING MOTHERS: Both benazepril and HCTZ are excreted in breast milk and may potentially affect nursing infants.

SIDE EFFECTS: Lotensin HCT has side effects of its individual components. The most common side effects are dizziness, fatigue, low blood pressure, rash, muscle pain, stomach upset, sexual dysfunction, and decreased or increased potassium blood levels.



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