benazepril, Lotensin HTC (cont.)

Pharmacy Author:
Medical and Pharmacy Editor:

A dry, persistent cough has been reported with the use of benazepril and other ACE inhibitors. Coughing resolves after discontinuing the medication.

In rare instances, liver dysfunction and skin yellowing (jaundice) have been reported with ACE inhibitors. Benazepril should not be taken by people with a known allergy to ACE inhibitors. Swelling of the facial tissues and even the upper airways has been reported with ACE inhibitors on very rare occasions, and can lead to serious breathing difficulties. In rare instances, low white blood cell counts have been reported with the use of one ACE inhibitor. Low white blood cells increase the patient's risk of infections.



PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 5, 10, 20, and 40 mg.

STORAGE: Tablets should be stored at room temperature at or below 30 C (86 F) and protected from moisture.

DOSING: The usual starting dose of benazepril is 10 mg daily. If patients are taking a diuretic (water pill) the starting dose is 5 mg daily. Doses may be increased to 20-40 mg once daily or divided and administered twice daily.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Combining benazepril with potassium supplements, potassium containing salt substitutes, and potassium conserving diuretics such as amiloride (Moduretic), spironolactone (Aldactone), and triamterene (Dyazide, Maxzide), can lead to dangerously high blood levels of potassium.

Combining benazepril or other ACE inhibitors with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients who are elderly, fluid-depleted (including those on diuretic therapy), or with poor kidney function may result in reduced kidney function, including kidney failure. These effects usually are reversible.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/17/2015

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Pill Finder Tool

Need help identifying pills and medications?
Use the pill identifier tool on RxList.

Back to Medications Index