Balloon Endoscopy (Balloon Enteroscopy)

  • Medical Author:
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

  • Medical Editor: Dennis Lee, MD
    Dennis Lee, MD

    Dennis Lee, MD

    Dr. Lee was born in Shanghai, China, and received his college and medical training in the United States. He is fluent in English and three Chinese dialects. He graduated with chemistry departmental honors from Harvey Mudd College. He was appointed president of AOA society at UCLA School of Medicine. He underwent internal medicine residency and gastroenterology fellowship training at Cedars Sinai Medical Center.

View the Heartburn Foods to Avoid Slideshow

Double balloon endoscopy

For double balloon endoscopy, similar equipment is used, but a second balloon is located on the tip of the endoscope. Both balloons - the one on the overtube and the one on the endoscope - can be alternatively inflated to anchor the overtube or the endoscope to assist with the passage of the endoscope or overtube, respectively.

What to expect with balloon endoscopy

Balloon endoscopy, like other gastrointestinal endoscopy, requires intravenous sedation. The procedures are long, often requiring 1-3 hours. The most important complications of balloon endoscopy are perforation of the small intestine or bleeding either due to insertion of the endoscope or use of therapeutic instruments.

What is the future for balloon endoscopy?

Balloon endoscopy is revolutionizing the diagnosis and treatment of small intestinal diseases. Nevertheless, its use is restricted because of the large expenditure of time that is necessary to perform it. Either newer, faster systems will need to be designed or, perhaps, paramedical personnel will be needed to perform the insertions before balloon endoscopy is as commonly performed as other types of endoscopy. For now, when there is concern about disease in the small intestine, wireless capsule endoscopy often is performed first. Then, if abnormalities are found, or if despite a normal capsule endoscopy there still is a strong suspicion that there is disease in the small intestine, balloon endoscopy is performed.

Medically reviewed by John A. Daller, MD; American Board of Surgery with subspecialty certification in surgical critical care

REFERENCE:

"Overview of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (esophagogastroduodenoscopy)"
UpToDate.com

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/23/2015

Subscribe to MedicineNet's Newsletters

Get the latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors