Patient Comments: Baker Cyst - Treatments

What treatment was effective for your Baker's cyst?

Comment from: 8280160, 19-24 Female (Patient) Published: December 19

I am 22 year old fit female. I ruptured my ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) while skiing three and a half months ago and developed DVT (deep vein thrombosis) shortly after the injury. Finally got the all clear of no more DVT and had my ACL reconstruction surgery last week. A precautionary ultrasound looking for DVT found a Baker's cyst. There was no pain until day 4 and it is nothing like I've experienced before. Not helping my surgery recovery either as bending my knee is limited due to the pain and swelling. Like others have said, neither oxycodone nor tramadol have been able to relieve the pain.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: LizMac, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: August 11

To my knowledge I never had a Baker's cyst until after a total knee replacement (TKR) of my left knee in 2006. From the day of the surgery to now (7/2014) I have had problems with that knee swelling. I've been to at least 7 highly regarded specialists. No one could ever find a cause for the swelling. I would be just standing and within 30 seconds my knee would swell to the point I could not walk. Sometimes it swelled so much my knee felt like it dislocated and I screamed for days. About 10 months ago I was diagnosed with a chronic deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in that leg. So when my knee suddenly swelled a couple of weeks ago, my doctor sent me to the emergency room (ER) for ultrasound. There was no clot but I was told I had a Baker's cyst. I assume it had sprung a leak. Then earlier this week, I woke up with the worst pain imaginable in the calf. It was huge, hot, and red. I went back to ER by ambulance because I couldn't bend my knee to get into a car. I had another ultrasound and was told my cyst had ruptured and the empty sac had been sucked down into the calf with the synovial fluid. They said nothing could be done. I have stayed mostly in bed with the leg elevated and ice on the calf off and on. This is day four. My leg from the knee to my ankle is swollen, purple and hurts to touch. I didn't have a cyst problem until after my TKR. I had a TKR of my right knee about four years ago by a different surgeon/different hospital and have never had one second's problem. Only had to have four sessions of physiotherapy. Two weeks after that surgery I was at a baseball game walking up and down the stands without help of any kind. Now I have had to give up my volunteer job.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: March 04

I was just told I have a Baker's cyst behind my knee. I first started having terrible pain behind my knee, lower leg and upper leg. My knee is weak, I have been wrapping my leg and it seems to helping. I am also taking pain medication. My doctor wants me to go a specialist, I can"t really afford that right now. I"ve decided to take charge of my body by dieting, and being a little more aware of my limitations because I"m not in my 20s anymore.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: XocaiKy, 55-64 Female (Caregiver) Published: September 28

I was recently diagnosed with a Baker's cyst (broke right foot and in healing tore left leg up), and as it is an inflammatory condition, I increased my consumption of Healthy Chocolate (TM) and reduced the swelling by consuming high amounts of antioxidants. This same pharmaceutical grade chocolate had previously eliminated the arthritis I had in my hands, and it tastes good! Replace the junk chocolate candy you undoubtedly eat with Healthy Chocolate and feel the difference!

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: Patricia, 55-64 Female Published: May 21

Almost two years ago, I developed a Baker's Cyst behind my left knee. I believe it was caused by improper use of a treadmill, though I suffered no particular injury. It just developed and one day I discovered this lump about the size of a ping-pong ball behind my knee. I had the lovely experience of going to 3 doctors for help and being told that it was just one of those things I would have to live with, after all, I was getting older, blah, blah, blah. They all said it could not be healed without surgery, which has its own dangers. I refused to believe them and decided to treat the cyst myself. I got a support bandage for starters and kept the leg elevated whenever feasible. Then I began gentle leg exercises like knee extensions to strengthen the overall leg muscles from ankle on up and to stabilize the knee. I did both legs, for good measure and yoga for overall body strength and flexibility. It took a year of concerted effort, but it worked. The cyst is now the size of a pea and no problem. I'm just more careful these days.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: kariann330, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: March 20

I ended up having mine surgically removed as a minor. There was no initial pain as it wasn't caused by trauma but was caused by extra tissue in the joint. Over time before removal there was tightness in my calf and wearing heels was not an option at all. Now that it has been several years my knee is 100% again and I am able to do whatever I wish, swimming, wearing heels, dancing ect.

Was this comment helpful?Yes

Patient Comments

Viewers share their comments

Baker Cyst - Describe Your Experience Question: Please describe your experience with Baker cyst.
Baker Cyst - Symptoms Question: What symptoms did you experience with your Baker cyst?

Patient Comments are not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified health provider because of something you have read on MedicineNet. The opinions expressed in the comments section are of the author and the author alone. MedicineNet does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.

Alert If you think you have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.