Baikal Skullcap

What other names is Baikal Skullcap known by?

Baikal Scullcap, Baikal Skullcap Root, Chinese Skullcap, Escutelaria Asiatica, Huang Qin, Huangquin, Hwanggum, Ogon, Ou-gon, Racine de Scutellaire du Lac Baïkal, Radix Scutellariae, Scullcap, Scute, Scutellaire, Scutellaire Chinoise, Scutellaire du Lac Baïkal, Scutellaria, Scutellaria baicalensis, Scutellaria macrantha, Scutellariae Radix, Skullcap, Wogon.

What is Baikal Skullcap?

Baikal skullcap (scientific name Scutellaria baicalensis) is a plant. The root is used to make medicine. Common substitutions for Baikal skullcap in Chinese medicine include related plants whose scientific names are Scutellaria viscidula, Scutellaria amonea, and Scutellaria ikoninikovii.

Baikal skullcap is used to treat respiratory infections, hay fever, and fever. It is also used for gastrointestinal (GI) infections, as well as liver problems including viral hepatitis and jaundice.

Some people use Baikal skullcap for HIV/AIDS, kidney infections, pelvic inflammation, and sores or swelling. It is also used for scarlet fever, headache, irritability, red eyes, flushed face, seizures, epilepsy, hysteria, nervous tension, and to relieve a bitter taste in the mouth.

The active ingredient in Baikal skullcap, baicalin, is used in combination with shung hua (ephedra) to treat upper respiratory tract infections. In combination with other herbs, Baikal skullcap is used to treat attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), prostate cancer, a lung condition called bronchiolitis, arthritis, and hemorrhoids.

Baikal skullcap is also sometimes applied to the skin for psoriasis.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Inflammation of small air passages in the lung (bronchiolitis) and other lung infections. Developing research suggests that a combination of Baikal skullcap, forsythia, and honeysuckle given intravenously (IV) by a healthcare provider might help children who have bronchiolitis due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection feel better faster.
  • Arthritis. Some research shows that a specific commercial product (Limbrel, Primus Pharmaceuticals) that contains a combination of chemicals from Baikal skullcap and catechu, also known as flavocoxid, might help for arthritis in the knee. But there is not enough good quality research to know how well this product might work.
  • Psoriasis. There is one report that an ointment containing Baikal skullcap plus phellodendron and isatis improved psoriasis in an 8-year-old boy.
  • Kidney, stomach, and pelvic infections.
  • Hay fever.
  • Seizures.
  • HIV/AIDS.
  • Nervous tension.
  • Hemorrhoids.
  • Prostate cancer.
  • Hepatitis.
  • Sores or swelling.
  • Fever.
  • Headache.
  • Red eyes.
  • Flushed face.
  • Bitter taste in the mouth.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate Baikal skullcap for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).


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