Asthma: Over-the-Counter Treatment

  • Medical Author:
    George Schiffman, MD, FCCP

    Dr. Schiffman received his B.S. degree with High Honors in biology from Hobart College in 1976. He then moved to Chicago where he studied biochemistry at the University of Illinois, Chicago Circle. He attended Rush Medical College where he received his M.D. degree in 1982 and was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society. He completed his Internal Medicine internship and residency at the University of California, Irvine.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

View Asthma Slideshow Pictures

Quick GuideAsthma Pictures Slideshow: An Inflammatory Disorder of the Airways

Asthma Pictures Slideshow: An Inflammatory Disorder of the Airways

What are additional measures in the management of asthma?

  1. Patients should avoid known triggers of asthma attacks (for example, exercise or allergens).
  2. Good control of allergic rhinitis (nasal allergies) helps to control asthma. Now there are OTC inhaled nasal steroids (Nasonex, Flonase) that are available and very effective in treating allergic rhinitis. It is important to understand that using these agents does not immediately relieve symptoms. It often requires 7 or more days of use to realize the true effectiveness of these medications.
  3. Some patients with asthma must avoid aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen and Motrin since they may induce an episode of asthma.
  4. All asthma patients should avoid beta-blocker drugs (Inderal, Tenormin, Visken, and Lopressor) because they may worsen asthma or precipitate an episode.
  5. All patients with asthma should seek professional advice from their physicians on how to optimally manage their condition.

REFERENCES:

"Over-the-counter Medications." Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America.

"Safety Concerns with Asthmanefrin and the EZ Breathe Atomizer." FDA. 2013.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/2/2015

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