Do I need Rehab to Quit Percocet?

  • Medical Author:
    Standiford Helm II, MD

    Dr. Helm has been practicing interventional pain management since 1982. Dr. Helm is a diplomate of the American Board of Anesthesiology with subspecialty certification in Pain Medicine and of the American Board of Pain Medicine. Dr. Helm is a Fellow of Interventional Pain Practice (FIPP), the only certifying agency which tests the ability to perform interventional pain procedures. Dr. Helm is also an examiner for FIPP.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Surprising Reasons You're in Pain Slideshow

Ask the experts

How do I withdraw from Percocet?

Doctor's response

Percocet is a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen. Oxycodone is a Schedule II opioid and can lead to physical dependence. It is very likely that if you abruptly stop taking Percocet ("go cold turkey") that you might have withdrawal symptoms, including flu-like symptoms, bone ache, tremors, goose bumps and diarrhea. While withdrawal from opioids is not fatal, it is also not pleasant. To avoid withdrawal symptoms, you should consult with the physician who prescribed the Percocet to discuss what options you have to taper off of it. These would include a gradual tapering (reduction in the dosage), entering a detoxification facility, or switching to a medication like Suboxone to wean off the medication.

If you have been using the Percocet recreationally rather than for a medical purpose, you should consult with either an Addictionologist or your personal physician on how best to deal with the addiction issues. Suboxone was specifically developed to allow for office-based treatment of opioid dependence. It is most effective if combined with counseling, including Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or Narcotics Anonymous (NA).

Medically reviewed by John A. Daller, MD; American Board of Surgery with subspecialty certification in surgical critical care

REFERENCE:

"Overview of the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain"
UpToDate.com


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Chronic Pain: Causes and Solutions

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Reviewed on 9/15/2017

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