Apple Cider Vinegar

How does Apple Cider Vinegar work?

Apple cider vinegar is the fermented juice of crushed apples. It contains acetic acid and nutrients such as B vitamins and vitamin C. Apple cider vinegar might help lower blood sugar levels in people with diabetes by changing how foods get absorbed from the gut. Apple cider vinegar might prevent the breakdown of some foods.

Are there safety concerns?

Consuming apple cider vinegar in food amounts is LIKELY SAFE. Apple cider vinegar is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when used short-term for medical purposes.

In some cases, consuming a lot of apple cider vinegar might not be safe. Consuming 8 ounces of apple cider vinegar per day, long-term might lead to problems such as low potassium. There has been one report of a person who developed low potassium levels and weak bones (osteoporosis) after taking 250 mL apple cider vinegar daily for 6 years. In another report, a woman who had an apple cider vinegar tablet lodged in her throat for 30 minutes developed tenderness and pain in her voice box and difficulty swallowing for 6 months following the incident. This was thought to be due to the acid content of the tablet.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the safety of using apple cider vinegar as medicine during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side, and don't use it.

Diabetes: Apple cider vinegar might lower blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Therefore, blood sugar levels need to be monitored closely. Dose adjustments may be necessary for diabetes medications that are taken.


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