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antihemophilic factor (factor viii), human - injection, Alphanate (cont.)

HOW TO USE: This medication is given by injection into a vein, usually over 5 to 10 minutes or as directed by your doctor. The medication may need to be given more slowly over a longer time depending on your dose and how you respond to it.After first receiving this medication in a hemophilia treatment center or hospital, some patients may be able to give this medication to themselves at home. If your doctor directs you to give this medication at home, read the product information available from your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. Learn all preparation and usage instructions in the product package. If you have any questions, ask your health care professional.If the medication and the solution used to mix it have been refrigerated, bring both to room temperature before combining. After adding the solution to the powder, some brands of this medication may require you to shake the vial for 10 to 15 seconds before gently swirling the vial to completely dissolve the powder. Other brands do not recommend shaking the vial. Ask your pharmacist about the proper way to mix your medication. Before using this product, check it visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the liquid. Use immediately (See also Storage).The dosage is based on your medical condition, weight, blood test results, and response to treatment. Follow your doctor's instructions closely. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.Learn how to store and discard needles and medical supplies safely. Consult your pharmacist.Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

SIDE EFFECTS: Flushing of the face, nausea, vomiting, and fast heartbeat may sometimes occur and can be lessened by giving this medication more slowly. Burning/redness/irritation at the injection site, fever, chills, and headache may also occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: signs of anemia (e.g., tiredness, low energy, pale skin color, shortness of breath), new or worsening bleeding/bruising.This medication is made from human blood. There is a very small chance that you may get infections from this medication (e.g., viral infections such as hepatitis), even though careful screening of blood donors, special manufacturing processes, and many tests are all used to reduce this risk. Discuss the benefits and risks of treatment with your doctor. Tell your doctor immediately if you develop any signs of hepatitis or other infection, including fever, persistent sore throat, unusual tiredness, unusual drowsiness, joint pain, persistent nausea/vomiting, stomach/abdominal pain, yellowing eyes/skin, dark urine.A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing, chest discomfort/tightness.This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/16/2014


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