Alzheimer's Disease Causes, Stages, and Symptoms (cont.)

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Who Would Take Care of the Person with Alzheimer's disease if Something Happened to You?

It is important to have a plan in case of your own illness, disability, or death.

  • Consult a lawyer about setting up a living trust, durable power of attorney for health care and finances, and other estate planning tools.
  • Consult with family and close friends to decide who will take responsibility for the person with Alzheimer's. You also may want to seek information about your local public guardian's office, mental health conservator's office, adult protective services, or other case management services. These organizations may have programs to assist the person with Alzheimer's in your absence.
  • Maintain a notebook for the responsible person who will assume caregiving. Such a notebook should contain the following information:
    • emergency phone numbers
    • current problem behaviors and possible solutions
    • ways to calm the person with Alzheimer's
    • assistance needed with toileting, feeding, or grooming
    • favorite activities or food

Preview board and care or long-term care facilities in your community and select a few as possibilities. Share this information with the responsible person. If the person with Alzheimer's disease is no longer able to live at home, the responsible person will be better able to carry out your wishes for long-term care.

Conclusion

Home safety takes many forms. This booklet focuses on the physical environment and specific safety concerns. But the home environment also involves the needs, feelings, and lifestyles of you the caregiver, your family, and the person with Alzheimer's disease. Disability affects all family members, and it is crucial to maintain your emotional and physical welfare in addition to ensuring a safe environment.

We encourage you to make sure you have quiet time, time out, and time to take part in something you enjoy. Protect your own emotional and physical health. Your local Alzheimer's Association chapter can help you with the support and information you may need as you address this very significant checkpoint in your home safety list. You are extremely valuable. As you take on a commitment to care for a person with Alzheimer's, please take on the equally important commitment to care for yourself.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/5/2013

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Alzheimer's Disease - Describe Your Experience Question: Please describe the symptoms you or loved one experienced with Alzheimer's disease.
Alzheimer's Disease - Treatments Question: What stage of Alzheimer's disease are you or your loved one currently experiencing, and have any treatments been effective?
Alzheimer's Disease - Prognosis Question: What is the prognosis for your friend or relative who has Alzheimer's disease?
Alzheimer's Disease - Dementia Question: Has a friend or relative been diagnosed with dementia? What are her/his symptoms?
Alzheimer's Disease - Warning Signs Question: Do you have any of the warning signs of Alzheimer's? Please discuss your symptoms and concerns.
Alzheimer's Disease - Home Safety Question: In what ways have you made the home safer for a friend or relative with Alzheimer's disease?
Alzheimer's Disease - Medications Question: If your relative is on a medication for Alzheimer's, what changes have you noticed?
Alzheimer's Disease - Driving Question: What motivated you to take away the keys or car from your loved one who has Alzheimer's?

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