Patient Comments: Alopecia Areata - Effective Treatments

What treatments have been effective for your alopecia areata?

Comment from: Pauline, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: August 21

I have suffered from alopecia areata many times over the last 10 years or more. I have cortisone injections done in the affected spots, the hair does start growing back quite quickly. Your dermatologist should be able to do this for you.

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Comment from: Bronwyn, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: April 21

I've had alopecia areata for 8.5 months now. I have had cortisone injections into the scalp and cortisone lotion (which ruined the texture of my hair). I've done laser acupuncture, also taken supplements like Laminine, Biotin, magnesium chelate, an immune-system balancer, Hairpro, and calcium/vitamin D and zinc. Nothing has worked and I have so little hair left. I am now taking Minoxidil and dexamethasone in a last ditch attempt. I have been suffering from migraines the last few days which I don't normally do. Like others I am devastated from this horrible thing."

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Comment from: Unknown, Female (Patient) Published: December 10

I rarely get bald spots, my first was in 1993, and I'm on my 4th. For my 2nd and 3rd bald spots, my doctor gave me some kind of corticosteroid shots in the bald spot and the hair regrew quickly after that. (I'm living elsewhere now and haven't found a new doctor yet.) My experience is that, like with any auto-immune disease, stress exacerbates alopecia areata. My bald spots have appeared at times of stress. I suspect my grandmother had alopecia and I inherited it from her.

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Comment from: Spotty, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: June 04

I am 54 years old and experiencing alopecia areata since last year. I had a sudden period of extreme stress that may have prompted the loss, but had also tried a medicine for a nail fungus around the same time. I see one doctor (a rheumatologist) for a possible lupus diagnosis (lupus is difficult to diagnose) and my primary care doctor was also treating me for hypothyroidism since I was gaining weight, and had increased my dosage from a very low beginning strength to a slight increase. With all of that going on I am not sure what the exact cause of the hair loss was. I stopped all medications immediately. I jokingly told my doctor that I can handle being fat, I"m ok with getting old, but old, fat and bald wasn"t going to work for me. My other doctor did some blood work and suggested I take zinc supplements, and things improved. The nail fungus went away, my hair started re-growing, and I perked up a little despite being off the thyroid medicines. Just this week I noticed a quarter sized spot which is increasing in size, and I"m back online searching for answers. The only changes this time is that I had changed brands of zinc, maybe it"s time to go back to what was working.

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Comment from: nk186, 19-24 Female (Patient) Published: March 26

I have alopecia areata and I have yet to go to the doctor to do blood tests, but I noticed a small bald patch on top of my head a year ago and I did nothing. Then this year it looked bigger so I started to massage my head at night and twice a week use an oil therapy that I massage into my head and sleep with. The next morning I shower and my hair feels soft and my scalp feels good. The oil treatment consists of jojoba oil, coconut oil, almond oil and tea tree oil. Within two months I noticed little tiny hairs growing. I am not sure if this will work for everyone but I do believe for some this disease is a sign of a malnourished scalp. Massage the spot in the shower and before bed. Hope it works for you.

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Comment from: apennix29, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: January 13

I have had alopecia for almost 4 years and I was given steroid injections in my scalp to speed up the hair regrowth process and it didn't work for me.

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Comment from: palo, 35-44 Male (Patient) Published: June 20

Alopecia areata is from destabilized control of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Check CD4/CD8 ratio and latent EBV antibodies levels. I'm sure you will find imbalance. In my case it's from tonsil removal and decreased CD8 count and small intestine EBV colonization. Sadly no medicine yet for me, only current possibility is experimental treatment with cloned CD8.

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