Alopecia Areata (cont.)

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What are the different patterns of alopecia areata?

The most common pattern is one or more well-defined spots of hair loss on the scalp. There is also a form of more generalized loss of hair referred to as diffuse alopecia areata throughout the scalp. Occasionally, all of the scalp hair is lost, a condition referred to as alopecia totalis. Less frequently, the loss of all of the hairs on the entire body, called alopecia universalis, occurs.

Who is affected by alopecia areata?

Alopecia areata tends to occur most often in adults 30 to 60 years of age. However, it can also affect older individuals and rarely toddlers. Alopecia areata is not contagious. It should be distinguished from hair shedding that may occur following the discontinuation of hormonal estrogen and progesterone therapies for birth control or the hair shedding associated with the end of pregnancy. There are a number of treatable conditions that could be confused with alopecia areata.

How is alopecia areata diagnosed?

The characteristic finding of alopecia areata is a well-circumscribed area or areas of hairless skin in an area of normal hair growth. Occasionally, it may be necessary to biopsy the scalp to support the diagnosis. Other findings that may be helpful are the appearance of short hairs that presumably represent fractured hairs, yellow areas of skin deposition at the follicular orifice, short thin hairs, and grey hair all present in a bald area. Other causes of hair loss are generally excluded from the consideration by history and clinical evaluation.

What is the treatment for alopecia areata?

The course of typical alopecia areata is not predictable with a high likelihood of spontaneous remission. The longer the period of time of hair loss and the larger the area involved, the less likely the hair will regrow. Therefore, there are a variety of treatments, but none of these can confidently be predicted to impact the course of this disease. Steroid injections and steroid creams, lotions and shampoos have been used for many years.

As with many chronic disorders for which there is no single treatment, a variety of remedies are promoted which in fact have no benefit. There is no known effective method of prevention, although the elimination of emotional stress is felt to be helpful. No drugs or hair-care products have been associated with the onset of alopecia areata.

Although not precisely a treatment, the cosmetic camouflage of alopecia areata is certainly an important consideration in patient management. The damaging emotional effect of significant hair loss for both women and men can be considerable.

Previous contributing author: Zoe Diana Draelos, MD, PA

Medically reviewed by Norman Levine, MD; American Board of Dermatology

REFERENCE:

National Alopecia Areata Foundation


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/26/2014

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