Aloe

What other names is Aloe known by?

Aloe africana, Aloe arborescens, Aloe barbadensis, Aloe Capensis, Aloe ferox, Aloe frutescens, Aloe Gel, Aloe indica, Aloe Latex, Aloe Leaf Gel, Aloe natalenis, Aloe Perfoliata, Aloe perryi, Aloe spicata, Aloe supralaevis, Aloe ucriae, Aloe Vera Barbenoids, Aloe Vera Gel, Aloe vera, Aloes, Aloès, Aloès de Curaçao, Aloès des Barbades, Aloès du Cap, Aloès Vrai, Aloès Vulgaire, Arborescens natalenis, Barbados Aloe, Burn Plant, Cape Aloe, Chritkumari, Curacao Aloe, Elephant's Gall, Gel de la Feuille d'Aloès, Ghee-Kunwar, Ghi-Kuvar, Ghrita-Kumari, Gvar Patha, Hsiang-Dan, Indian Aloe, Jafarabad Aloe, Kanya, Kumari, Latex d'Aloès, Lily of the Desert, Lu-Hui, Miracle Plant, Plant of Immortality, Plante de l'Immortalité, Plante de la Peau, Plante de Premiers Secours, Plante Miracle, Plantes des Brûlures, Sábila.

What is Aloe?

Aloe gel is the clear, jelly-like substance found in the inner part of the aloe leaf. Aloe latex comes from just under the skin of the leaf and is yellow in color. The latex drains out when the leaf is cut. Some aloe products are made from the whole leaf and contain both the aloe gel and the latex.

Is Aloe effective?

There is some scientific evidence that aloe gel might help when used on the skin for reducing the pain and swelling of burns, to speed the healing of burns, and for skin sores, psoriasis, and frostbite.

There isn't enough information to know if aloe gel is effective for the other conditions people use it for, including: arthritis, fever, itching, stomach ulcers, diabetes, and asthma.

Possibly Effective for...

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Wound healing, healing skin sores, frostbite, burns, genital herpes, high cholesterol, skin problems caused by radiation used to treat cancer, arthritis, fever, ulcerative colitis, itching, stomach ulcers, diabetes, and asthma.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).


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