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ipratropium/albuterol (salbutamol) inhaler - oral, Combivent (cont.)

HOW TO USE: Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start using this product and each time you get a refill. Learn how to use this inhaler properly. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.Follow the instructions for "test-spraying" (priming) the inhaler if you are using it for the first time or if you have not used it for more than 24 hours. When priming the inhaler, make sure to spray away from the face so that you do not get the medication into your eyes.Before each inhalation, shake the inhaler well for at least 10 seconds. Inhale this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 4 times daily. If two inhalations at a time are prescribed, wait at least 2 minutes between them. Your doctor may also direct you to use this medication as needed for wheezing and shortness of breath. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. However, the manufacturer recommends that you do not use more than 12 inhalations in a 24-hour period. Doing so may increase the risk of serious side effects.The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment.Avoid getting this medication into your eyes. It may cause eye pain/irritation, temporary blurred vision, and other vision changes. Therefore, when using the inhaler, put your lips tightly around the mouthpiece and keep your eyes closed.Rinse your mouth after using the inhaler to prevent dry mouth and throat irritation.Use this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. This medication works best if used at evenly spaced intervals. To help you remember, use it at the same times each day. Do not increase your dose, use this medication more often, or stop using it without first consulting your doctor.Keep track of the number of inhalations you use, and throw away the canister after you have used the labeled number of inhalations on the package.Learn which of your inhalers you should use every day and which you should use if your breathing suddenly worsens. Ask your doctor ahead of time what to do if you have worsening cough or shortness of breath, wheezing, increased sputum, worsening peak flow meter readings, increased use of your quick-relief inhaler, or if your quick-relief inhaler does not seem to be working well. Learn when you can treat breathing problems by yourself and when you must get medical help right away.Tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they worsen.



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