Fever

  • Medical Author:
    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

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What kind of doctors treat a fever?

Any kind of doctor is able to treat a fever, but most likely when you have a fever you will see your family medicine specialist (also called a general practitioner) or internist, and your child will see a pediatrician. You may see an emergency-medicine specialist in an emergency department.

If fever is due to a specific underlying or recurrent medical condition, you may see a specialist for that particular condition. For example, if a person has cancer and a fever, an oncologist may be consulted. A pregnant woman with a fever may see her obstetrician. Newborns with fever may see neonatal specialists. Patients with HIV/AIDS and fever may consult an infectious-disease specialist.

What are complications of a fever?

While having a fever is generally very uncomfortable, a fever itself does not usually cause severe complications.

High fever (>103 F/40 C) or prolonged bouts of fever can lead to

It is important to seek treatment for the underlying cause of a fever in the situations described above. Many of the infections that can cause fever can lead to severe complications if untreated.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/1/2016

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