acebutolol, Sectral, Prent

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Annette (Gbemudu) Ogbru, PharmD, MBA

    Dr. Gbemudu received her B.S. in Biochemistry from Nova Southeastern University, her PharmD degree from University of Maryland, and MBA degree from University of Baltimore. She completed a one year post-doctoral fellowship with Rutgers University and Bristol Myers Squibb.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

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DRUG INTERACTIONS: The use of beta-blockers together with fenoldopam (Corlopam), a drug used to manage severe high blood pressure, may result in unexpectedly low blood pressure since beta-adrenergic blocking drugs add to the blood pressure-lowering effects of fenoldopam.

With concomitant use of clonidine (Catapres) and beta-adrenergic blocking drugs, severe high blood pressure may occur if patients abruptly discontinue the clonidine. Because of this effect, it is advisable to discontinue beta-adrenergic blocking drugs prior to starting clonidine.

Using epinephrine (Adrenalin, EpiPen) and beta-adrenergic blocking drugs together causes high blood pressure and a slow heartbeat since the beta-adrenergic stimulating effects of epinephrine that raise blood pressure and heart rate are exaggerated by the beta-adrenergic blocking drugs which prevent dilation of the blood vessels and increase the heart rate. To avoid this effect, it is best not to use both drugs together. If, however, both drugs are administered together, it is important to monitor blood pressure levels. Also, high blood pressure and a slow heartbeat are less likely to occur if beta-adrenergic blocking drugs that are selective for the heart such as atenolol (Tenormin) and acebutolol (Sectral) are used.

Epinephrine- and norepinephrine-depleting drugs, such as reserpine (Harmonyl), may have an additive effect when given with beta-blocking drugs and cause an abnormally slow heart beat or low blood pressure, which may give rise to dizziness or fainting.

PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies of acebutolol in pregnant women. It should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the risk to the fetus

NURSING MOTHERS: Acebutolol is excreted in human milk, and use among nursing mothers is discouraged.

Medically reviewed by Eni Williams, PharmD

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/28/2015

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