Abdominal Pain (Causes, Remedies, Treatment)

Signs and symptoms associated with abdominal pain (Part 2)

  • The pattern of the pain.
    • Obstruction of the intestine initially causes waves of crampy abdominal pain due to contractions of the intestinal muscles and distention of the intestine.
    • True cramp-like pain suggests vigorous contractions of the intestines.
    • Obstruction of the bile ducts by gallstones typically causes steady (constant) upper abdominal pain that lasts between 30 minutes and several hours.
    • Acute pancreatitis typically causes severe, unrelenting, steady pain in the upper abdomen and upper back.
    • The pain of acute appendicitis initially may start near the umbilicus, but as the inflammation progresses, the pain moves to the right lower abdomen.
    • The character of pain may change over time. For example, obstruction of the bile ducts sometimes progresses to inflammation of the gallbladder with or without infection (acute cholecystitis). When this happens, the characteristics of the pain change to those of inflammatory pain. (See below.)
  • The duration of the pain.
    • The pain of IBS typically waxes and wanes over months or years and may last for years or decades.
    • Biliary colic lasts no more than several hours.
    • The pain of pancreatitis lasts one or more days.
    • The pain of acid-related diseases - gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or duodenal ulcers - typically show periodicity, that is, a period of weeks or months during which the pain is worse followed by periods of weeks or months during which the pain is better.
    • Functional pain may show this same pattern of periodicity.
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    Reviewed on 5/1/2015
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